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Ó Riordan, Colm, 1919-1992, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/534
  • Person
  • 31 May 1919-02 December 1992

Born: 31 May 1919, Oranmore, County Galway
Entered 07 September 1936, St Mary's, Emo, County Laois
Ordained: 31 July 1949, Milltown Park, Dublin
Professed: 05 November 1977
Died: 02 December 1992, Heathrow Airport, London, England in transit to Jesuit Residence, Kitwe, Zambia.

by 1952 at Chikuni, Chisekesi, N Rhodesia (POL Mi) working - fourth wave of Zambian Missioners

◆ Companions in Mission1880- Zambia-Malawi (ZAM) Obituaries :
In a letter written in January 1953 by Fr Colm (as he was known and not by his other names) to his Provincial, he wrote ‘Since July, new schools have been finished at Pemba, Haamapande, Siggubu, Ntambo, Lumbo, and Ntanga; new teachers' houses at Pemba, Ntambo, Sikabenga, Njola, Civuna, Fumbo, Ntanga and Nyanga’. He was Manager of
Schools since 1952 having learned ciTonga after he arrived in 1951. So much in so short a time!

Colm was born in Galway in the west of Ireland on 31 May of 1919. He was fluent at the Irish language which influenced the other languages in which he was proficient. After juniorate, philosophy, regency in Clongowes Wood College and theology, he was ordained priest in Milltown Park, Dublin in 1949. After tertianship, he came to Zambia in August 1951.

Education was his field of work for the forty years he lived and worked in Zambia. As Manager of Schools, he built both new schools and teachers' houses as exampled above. He became education secretary in Chikuni, Civuna and Monze up to 1960 and was responsible for building the church at Monze town. In the early days, he traveled by bicycle, motor bike and landrover setting up, visiting and inspecting schools.

Someone compared Fr Colm to that Irish 6th century Saint Columba (after whom Colm took his name). ‘He (Columba) was able, ardent and sometimes harsh but mellowed with age. The description is also apt for Colm. He was extremely able. As an educationist and administrator he was highly capable and was driven by a generous zeal for the Lord's work. Like other outstanding people there was also a negative side to his very positive character, at times he would appear moody or even harsh. But this was only a passing phase; like his patron Columba, he mellowed with age’.

His work in education continued in Lusaka from 1960 to 1976. He worked in the Catholic Secretariat as Education Secretary General 1960 to 1964 and combined this with the job of Secretary General 1964 to 1976. He was convinced of the value of education and the apostolate of education was his first preference. Charles Lwanga Teacher Training College was launched by him and he was responsible for the establishing and developing of lay missionary teachers (LMA T) so sorely needed in the early days of independence. He came to be widely known as a good organizer and administrator, a chairman who could be relied upon to give satisfaction, get work done and produce results.

In 1970 he was nominated by the President of Zambia to be chairman of a high level commission to review salaries, salary structures and conditions of service for the Public Service, including police and defense forces on a nationwide basis. However, he had not left his building skills behind in Monze for he planned and executed the Catholic Secretariat Building – Unity House on Freedom Way, as well as the residence at St. Ignatius Church in Lusaka.

His work became widely known and he was invited to cooperate in the setting up of a Bishops' Secretariat in Lesotho which occupied him from 1977 to 1978. He retired to Kitwe to be engaged mainly in pastoral work.

He was very loyal to his friends and devoted to others, ready to put himself out to help them. In the midst of all his education work, he was first and foremost a priest, very conscientious to his call to grow in the love and service of the Lord and bringing others to Him, helping others to seek and find God in their lives by his preaching, Mass, sacraments, retreats and counseling.

As the years went by, his health became quite a serious problem especially heart and circulation difficulties. He was in Ireland for treatment but his mind was made up to return to Zambia since he had become a Zambian citizen in 1966. At Heathrow airport on his way back, he collapsed and died on the 2 December 1992.

◆ Fr Francis Finegan : Admissions 1859-1948 - MICHAEL O'Riordan

Ó Peicín, Diarmuid T, 1916-2008, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/611
  • Person
  • 16 October 1916-04 March 2008

Born: 16 October 1916, Dublin
Entered: 07 September 1934, St Mary's, Emo, County Laois
Ordained: 31 July 1949, Milltown Park, Dublin
Professed: 15 August 1953, Sacred Heart College SJ (Crescent), Limerick
Died: 04 March 2008, Cherryfield Lodge, Dublin

Part of the Milltown Park, Dublin at the time of death

Dermot Peakin - by 1985 Diarmuid Ó Peicín;

by 1967 at Handsworth, Birmingham (ANG) working
by 1968 at Erdington, Birmingham (ANG) working
by 1970 at Walthamstow, London (ANG) working
by 1971 at London, England (ANG) working
by 1975 at Dockhead, London (ANG) working
by 1976 at Redcross, London (ANG) working
by 1977 at London W2 (ANG) working
by 1978 at Rotherhithe London (ANG) working

◆ Jesuits in Ireland : https://www.jesuit.ie/news/requiescat-in-pace/

Tributes for Diarmuid Ó Peicín SJ
Tributes have been paid to Fr Diarmuid Ó Peicín whose funeral took place on Friday 7 March 2008 and was featured on TG4 Nuacht. (www.tg4.tv > Cúrsaí Reatha – Cartlann >
Nuacht TG4 – 7/3/08) His work to save Tory island was the subject of the 2007 documentary Fear na n- Óilean and the film-maker Anne Marie Nic Ruaidhri told the Donegal Democrat that he was a leader who “inspired people, especially the Tory people, and he was passionate about island communities and helping them.” That passion led him to Europe where he found an unlikely ally in Dr. Ian Paisley. Minister for State, Pat “the Cope” Gallagher also paid tribute to Fr Ó Peicín saying it was ironic that he passed away on the same day that his friend Ian Paisley announced his retirement. March 2008

Please pray for the repose of Father Diarmuid Ó Peicín S.J. who died on 4 March 2008 at Cherryfield Lodge, Dublin, at 91 years of age. Born in Dublin on 16 October 1916, Diarmuid received his early education at the Christian Brothers (O’Connell Schools) and at Mungret College . He took his first vows in the Society of Jesus at Emo on 8 September 1936. During his Jesuit formation he studied Arts at UCD and philosophy at Saint Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, Offaly. He taught in Clongowes Wood College and Mungret College, Limerick before studying theology at Milltown Park, Dublin.
Ordained priest at Milltown Park at 31 July 1949, Diarmuid went on to teach at
Crescent College, Limerick and took final vows as a Jesuit on 15 August 1953 after which he taught in Mungret College, Limerick and at Rathmines Technical College. He spent some time engaged in pastoral work with Irish immigrants in Birmingham and London and, after a year in South Africa, returned to Ireland in 1980. Having spent three years as curate on Tory Island, he continued to work for the Comhdháil Oileáin na hÉireann – the Irish Islands’ Federation.

His experience on Tory was documented in his books, Tory Island: the island that wouldn’t go to sleep (Trafford, 1412028965) and Islanders: The True Story of One Man’s Fight to Save a Way of Life, (with Liam Nolan, Harper Collins 1997 978-0006279983) and in Lugh Films’ 52-minute documentary, Fear na nOileàn.

Ó Neachtain, Peadar, 1709-1756, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 29 June 1709-28 October 1756

Alias Ignatius Norton

Born 29 June 1709, Dublin
Entered 27 May 1729, Madrid, Spain - Toletanae Province (TOLE)
Ordained 1737, Toledo, Spain
Professed 02 February 1749
Died 28 October 1756, Murcia, Spain - Toletanae Province (TOLE)

Taught Rhetoric, Minis and Moral Theology. Was Prefect of Studies

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Teig (son of William) O’Neachtan and his wife Catherina Birmingham, not Cruice as O’Reilly wrongly states in his “Irish Writers”. A man named Birmingham is called in irish “MacFeorais” and a lady “Ni Cheoris:. Mrs O’Neachtan is called “mother of the reverend learned Father Peter O’Neachtan, of the holy Ordere of Jesus - do Naom Ord Iosa”
Note from John O’Neachton Entry :
A John O’Neachton wote verses “on the death of Catherine Cruice, wife of Teig O’Neachton, and mother of Peter SJ. They began : “Catriona ni Ceoris an oigbean bus aille - Catherinea Cruice, the young woman (who) was beautiful” (O’Reilly “Irish Writers”)

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Tadgh or Thady (poet) and Catherine née Nic Fheorais (Birmingham). Baptised by Canon Valentine Rivers (an alumnus of the Dublin Jesuit School)
Early education was at the Jesuit School in Dublin under Milo O’Byrne and then Philosophy at Canon John Harold’s Academy. In May 1728 with a letter of reccommendation to the Rector, he headed for Santiago (the events of his journey are recorded in a poem by his father), and after a few months there enterd the Irish College at Salamanca for a year before Ent 27/05/1729 Madrid
After First Vows he was sent for studies to Alcalà and for Theology to Toledo where he was Ordained 1737
1737-1743 Sent to teach Rhetoric to the Jesuit Scholastics at Villarejo
1743-1745 Sent to Alcalà to teach Philosophy
1745-1755 Sent to Murcia for a Chair of Moral theology.
1755 He was sent back to Alcalà to teach Moral Theology, but his health failed him afterwards and he had to resign. He moved to Murcia and died there 28/10/1756
In the Society Ó Neachtain was known by the anglicised version “Norton”. As an Irish speaker, The Mission Superior Thomas Hennessy had made representations to have him sent to the Irish Mission. His Superiors in TOLE had such a high regard for his gifts that they refused to release him.
His Obit pays triute to a man of high intellectual gifts, which inspired so many of his Spanish students, though he was also much sought after by lay people as a Spiritual Guide.

Ó Laoghaire, Diarmuid, 1915-2001, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/639
  • Person
  • 01 August 1915-21 July 2001

Born: 01 August 1915, Dublin
Entered: 07 September 1933, St Mary's, Emo, County Laois
Ordained: 28 July 1948
Professed: 02 February 1951
Died: 21 July 2001, St Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin

Part of the Milltown Park, Dublin community at the time of death.

by 1944 at St Mary’s College, Aberystwyth, Wales (ANG) studying
Editor of An Timire, 1971-1997.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
Ó Laoghaire, Diarmuid
by Brian Mac Cuarta

Ó Laoghaire, Diarmuid (1915–2001), writer and lecturer on Celtic spirituality, and Irish-language enthusiast, was born 1 August 1915 in Dublin, one of three children of Michael O'Leary from Doneraile, Co. Cork, and Mary O'Leary (née Flood), from Co. Meath; his father was manager of McBirney's department store on Aston Quay, Dublin. Brought up in Glasnevin and educated at Holy Faith convent school and Belvedere College (where he acquired a lifelong interest in cricket), he joined the Jesuits on leaving school in 1933.

Under the influence of his Irish teacher at Belvedere, the layman Tadhg Ó Murchadha, Diarmuid's interest in the language developed. He took Celtic studies at UCD, gaining an MA (1939) for a thesis on ‘Eochair-sgiath an Aifrinn’, a text on the mass by the seventeenth-century priest Geoffrey Keating (qv). He was awarded the NUI travelling studentship in Celtic studies. Because of the war, the British Museum manuscripts had been moved to Aberystwyth, Wales; at the suggestion of Robin Flower (qv), it was there that Ó Laoghaire pursued further research. Ordained in 1948, in the 1950s he was responsible for the Jesuit students in Rathfarnham Castle, while engaged in research, writing, and work with the Irish-language community. Prefect of studies at Belvedere (1960–62), he taught Irish at Gonzaga (1962–77), and thereafter was a member of the Jesuit community, Milltown Park. He was awarded an NUI Ph.D. from UCD in 1967 for a thesis on the lives of the saints, in Irish, in the medieval period. This research led to scholarly publications in Celtica, xxi (1990), 487–522, and a critical edition of ‘The Liber Flavus Fergusiorum infancy narrative’ (M. McNamara et al., Apocrypha Hiberniae (Turnhout, 2001), 142–245).

As well as speaking immaculate Irish, and fluent in French and Breton, he was well known throughout Wales, for he talked regularly on Welsh radio, and appeared on Welsh television. He translated a collection of short stories from the best modern Welsh authors into Irish (Glór ár nGaolta: Rogha scéalta na linne seo ón mBreatnais (1992)). For his abilities in Welsh he was made a member of the Gorsedd of bards in the Eisteddfod, the Welsh cultural festival; he preached in Welsh on occasions. His wide knowledge both of the spiritual texts and of the history and contemporary situation of the Celtic languages made him a respected authority on the Christian heritage of the Celtic world. On this topic he lectured in Milltown Institute of Philosophy and Theology, Dublin, and elsewhere. His Milltown Institute colleagues honoured him with a Festschrift (Mac Conmara agus Ní Thiarnaigh (eag.), Cothú an Dúchais (1997)), which included contributions from scholars in Wales, France, and Ireland. His academic, linguistic, and cultural interests were deeply integrated into his personal faith and his sense of mission as member of an apostolic order.

He was dedicated to exploring and fostering the link between Christian faith and Gaelic culture. Along with his more strictly scholarly interests, he devoted much time and energy to supporting and enriching the faith of the Irish-speaking community. This project was greatly energised by the change from Latin to the vernacular in the liturgy of the catholic church after the second Vatican council (1962–5). He rendered long and faithful service to a wide variety of groups, including Cumann na Sagart, Conradh na Gaeilge, An tOireachtas, Pobal an Aifrinn, An Chuallacht, Scoil Ghaelach Bhrí Chualann, and especially An Réalt, the Irish-language section of the Legion of Mary. In recognition of his services to Irish-language groups he was awarded Gradam an Phiarsaigh (the Pearse award) in 1992.

As editor of FÁS (Foilseacháin Ábhair Spioradálta, publisher of religious material in Irish), and through translations and other writings, Ó Laoghaire was one of those who ensured that a relatively varied spiritual and liturgical literature is available in Irish. Long a contributor, he was editor of An Timire (1972–97), the Irish-language devotional magazine founded by the Jesuits in 1911. A major contribution to the study of popular spirituality was his collection of prayers from the Gaelic oral tradition of Ireland and Scotland, Ár bPaidreacha Dúchais (1975), a book which has run into four editions. He died 21 July 2001 in Dublin. A catalogued bibliography of his books and pamphlets is in Milltown Park Library, Dublin.

R. Ó Glaisne, ‘Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire’, M. Mac Conmara agus E. Ní Thiarnaigh (eag.), Cothú an Dúchais (1997), 11–51

Ó Duibhir, Sean, 1921-2007, Jesuit priest and Irish language editor

  • IE IJA J/583
  • Person
  • 21 April 1921-23 October 2007

Born: 21 April 1921, Limerick City, County Limerick
Entered: 07 September 1939
Ordained: 31 July 1953
Professed: 05 November 1977
Died: 23 October 2007, St Vincent’s Hospital, Dublin

Editor of An Timire, 1949-71.

Part of the Milltown Park, Dublin community at the time of death.

Ó Cathain, Seán, 1905-1989, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/317
  • Person
  • 27 May 1905-26 December 1989

Born: 27 May 1905, Belfast, County Antrim
Entered: 31 August 1923, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly
Ordained: 31 July 1938
Professed: 02 February 1941
Died: 26 December 1989, Dublin

Part of the Sacred Heart community, Limerick.

by 1930 at Berchmanskolleg, Pullach, Germany (GER S) studying

Ó Cahan, Matthew, 1703-1739, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 21 September 1703-15 September 1739

Born 21 September 1703, Lisbon, Portugal
Entered 13 September 1720, Bordeaux, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)
Ordained 1730, Bordeaux, France
Professed 1737
Died 15 September 1739, Irish College, Poitiers, France - Aquitaniae Province (AQUIT)

1733-1737 At Irish College Poitiers teaching Humanities and Rhetoric
of Irish parentage

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Early education in Philosophy was at Irish College Poitiers
1722-1728 After First Vows he spent six years Regency and Périgueux and La Rochelle.
1728-1732 He then was set for Theology at Bordeaux and was Ordained 1730
1732-1733 He was sent teaching at Agen for a year
1733 Sent to Irish College Poitiers as Procurator, where he worked until he died 15/09/1739. He was regarded by his contemporaries as a man of deeply religious virtue
Ignatius Kelly and his successor, Thomas Hennessy both tried to have Matthew assigned to the Irish Mission. This is but one of many instances where Irish Jesuits regarded Jesuits born abroad of Irish parents as belonging potentially to their Mission in Ireland.

Ó Brolcháin, Pádraic, 1909-1955, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/315
  • Person
  • 22 October 1909-08 January 1955

Born: 22 October 1909, Dublin
Entered: 01 September 1928, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly
Ordained: 13 May 1942
Professed: 02 February 1945
Died: 08 January 1955, Dublin

Part of Coláiste Iognáid community, Galway at time of his death.

de Maistre, Joseph, 1861-1931, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 21 June 1861-03 May 1931

Born 21 June 1861, Beaumesnil, Normandy, France
Entered 14 August 1878, Angers France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained 1891
Professed 02 February 1894
Died 03 May 1931, Paris, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

by 1883 came to Limerick (HIB) for Regency 1882-1887

de MacCarthy, Nicolas Tuite, 1769-1833, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/279
  • Person
  • 21 May 1769-03 May 1833

Born: 21 May 1769, Dublin
Entered: 07 February 1818, Paris France - Galliae Province (GALL)
Ordained: 1814 - pre Entry
Professed: 15 August 1828, Annecy, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
Died: 03 May 1833, Annecy, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France - Galliae Province (GALL)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
From an illustrious Irish family. Aged four they moved to Toulouse, seeking liberty of conscience he couldn’t find in his own country.

After Ordination in 1814, he began that brilliant career which placed him in the foremost ranks of the most distinguished modern Preachers.
1817 or 1826 He was offered a Bishopric of Montaubon, but declined it to enter the Society , which he did the same year.

As a Religious, and until his death, he appeared in the principal pulpits in France, ad after 1830 preached in Rome, Turin and Annecy (cf de Backer “Biblioth. des Écrivains SJ”, where he has a list of his numerous published sermons and other works)
He was regarded in France as the ablest of her Preachers,
(cf Foley’s Collectanea)

de Leny, William, 1692-1760, Jesuit brother

  • Person
  • 11 August 1692-

Born 11 August 1692, Dublin
Entered 16 July 1717, Asunción, Paraguay - Paraguayensis Province (PAR)
Died 13 May 1760, Córdoba de Tucuman, Argentina - Paraguayensis Province (PAR)

◆ Fr John MacErlean SJ :
1720-1730 At College of Buenos Aires, Argentina
1730-1736 At College of Córdoba de Tucuman, Argentina
1736-1746 At College of Corrientes, Argentina (on the Paraná)
1748 At College of Córdoba de Tucuman, Argentina until his death in 1760

de Colgrave, Andrew Geoge, 1717-1768, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 17 November 1717-19 October 1768,

Born 17 November 1717, Ireland
Entered 02 September 1734, Rheims, Champagne, France - Campaniae Province (CAMP)
Professed 02 February 1752
Died 19 October 1768, Spetchley Park, Worcs, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

1746 was in 3rd year Theology
1752 at Dijon where he took 4 Vows on 02/02/1752
1754 Befoe this had taught Humanities and Philosophy for 5 years
In 1761 and 1763 Catalogue

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1746 In Third year Theology
1748-1754 Taught Philosophy in CAMP at Dijon
1754 Sent to ANG

de Bénazé, Octave Joseph, 1843-1908, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 14 September 1843-08 September 1908

Born 14 September 1843, Meillac, Brittany, France
Entered 03 March 1876, Angers, France - Franciae Province (FRA)
Ordained 1883
Professed 15 August 1891
Died 08 September 1908, Meillac, Brittany, France - Franciae Province (FRA)

Part of the Angers, France community at the time of death

by 1886 came to Mungret (HIB) as Minister, Teacher and Church 1885-1887

de Burgo, Thomas, 1747-1768, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 22 November 1722-25 April 1768

Born : 22 November 1722, Dublin
Entered : 30 July 1747, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained : 1747
Professed : 15 August1757
Died : 25 April 1768, Roman College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
1758 Preached the Passion Sermon in the presence of the Pope

◆ Fr Francis Finegan Sj :
Had already studied at the Irish College Rome and was Ordained there before Ent 30/07/1747 Rome

After First Vows he taught Humanities for two years.
1750-1756 Lectured Philosophy successively at Sorano, Recanati and Macerata
1756-1761 Cgair of Philosophy at the Roman College
1761-1765 Prefect of Studies at Roman College, and died in Office 25/04/1768

Zimmerman, Athanasius, 1839-1911, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 05 November 1839-12 March 1911

Born 05 November 1839, Betra, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Entered 22 October 1857, Baden-Würtemberg, Germany - Germaniae Province (GER)
Ordained 1872
Professed 15 August 1876
Died 12 March 1911, Valkenburg, Netherlands - Germaniae Province (GER)

Came to HIB to teach at Clongowes 1877 - 1885

Zenti, Francesco, 1814-1851, Jesuit brother

  • Person
  • 21 July 1814-16/02/1851

Born 21 July 1814, Bergamo, Lombardy, Italy
Entered 06 September 1840, Chieri Italy - Taurensis Province (TAUR)
Professed
Died 16 February 1851, Dublin - Taurensis Province (TAUR)

Part of the St Beuno’s, Wales community at the time of death

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
On the dispersion of the TAUR Province in the Revolution of 1848, he was sent to England and lived at St Beuno’s College.
His mind became affected and he was sent to Hartfield House, Drumcondra, Dublin for treatment.
He had a few days clarity and was able to go to Confession and Communion, but a few days later he suffered a hemorrhage, died and is buried at Glasnevin

Zarnitz, Clemens, 1851-1928, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 04 February 1851-17 May 1928

Born 04 February 1851, Beverungen, Westfalen, Germany
Entered 30 September 1869, Friedrichsburg Germany - Germaniae Province (GER)
Ordained 1882
Professed 15 August 1887
Died 17 May 1928, Dortmund, Westfalen, Germany - Germaniae Province (GER)

by 1885 came to Milltown (HIB) to lecture 1884-1886

Yüan Ting-tung, Matthew, 1923-1991, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 15 September 1923-08 May 1991

Born 15 September 1923, Shanghai, China
Entered 30 August 1945, Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained 18 March 1956
Professed 02 February 1963
Died 08 May 1991, Linkou, Taipei, Taiwan - Sinensis Province (CHN)

by 1959 came to Aberdeen Hong Kong (HIB) teaching

Young, John, 1589-1664, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 15 August 1589-13 July 1664

Born 15 August 1589, Cashel, Co Tipperary
Entered 13 May 1610, St Andrea, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)
Ordained 1621, Louvain, Belgium
Professed 14 July 1633
Died 13 July 1664, Irish College, Rome, Italy - Romanae Province (ROM)

Had studied Rhetoric before Entry then at Douai and Louvain
1655 In Irish College Rome (Fr Ferri being Rector)
1656-1660 Rector Irish College Rome (Bellarmino and Philip Roche are Consultors)
1662 John Young and William St Leger ask and obtain a papal indulgence for 100 Irish Jesuits (Arch Ir Col Rom XXVI 6)
Taught Humanities, Greek was Preacher, Superior, Master of Novices and Tertian Instructor
He wrote “Relationem de Civitate Corcagie et de Civicate Kilkennie” and “Libros Tres Militia Evangelicae” and “Vitam St Patrick Apostoli” and many other books.
His portrait was published in 1793 by William Richardson, Castle St, Leinster Sq, London

◆ Fr Edmund Hogan SJ “Catalogica Chronologica” :
Son of Robert Yong and Beatrice née Sall or Sallan (Sallanus)
Studied Humanities in Flanders before Ent, and then in the Society two years Philosophy and four years Theology.
1624 Sent to Ireland. He knew Latin, Greek, Irish, English, French and some Italian.
He taught Humanities and Greek for eight years; Preacher and Confessor for thirty years; Director of BVM Sodality twenty years; Superior of various Residences eighteen years; Master of Novices at Kilkenny and Galway five years; Consultor of Mission five years; Vice-Superior of Mission one year. (HIB CAT 1650 - ARSI) also Master of Tertians
He devoted himself to the Irish Mission for thirty years, chiefly in Cork, Waterford and Galway. During the persecution, he frequently went to people’s houses disguised as a miller.
He laid the foundation for the Novitiate at Waterford (should be Kilkenny?). He had to move this Novitiate to Galway, on account of the advance of the rebel Parliamentary forces, and was soon compelled to go with his novices to Europe.
He was then made Rector of the Irish College in Rome, and he was in office for eight years, and died in Rome 13/07/1664 aged 75 (Tanners “Confessors SJ”)
Several of his letters are extant and interesting. Several to Fr General dated Kilkenny, 30/01/1647, 30/06/1648, 31/12/1648, 08/02/1649, 22/06/1649 describe the situation relating to the history of this period. Later there are two letters from Galway to Fr General, 20/04/1650 and 14/08/1650 (Oliver, Stonyhurst MSS).
A Writer; A very holy Priest; He took a Vow to observe the Rules.
Mercure Verdier (Irish Mission Visitor reporting in 1649) described him as “a distinguished Preacher, and remarkable for every species of religious virtue”
Father General ordered his portrait to be taken after death and his panegyric to be preached in the Roman College

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
Son of Robert and Beatrice née Sall
Had made his classical education in Flanders before Ent 13/05/1610 Rome
1612-1617 After First Vows, because of ill health, he was sent to Belgium and Courtray (Kortrijk) for Regency where he taught Greek.
1617-1621 He was then sent for Philosophy at Antwerp and Theology at Louvain where he was Ordained 1621.
1621 Sent to Ireland and Cashel, Clonmel and Kilkenny - to the great regret of Lessius who had wanted him appointed as a Chair in Philosophy - where he devoted himself to teaching young people and giving missions.
For many years he was Superior at the Cork Residence
When the Novitiate opened in Kilkenny he was appointed Novice Master
1646-1647 During the inter-regnum that followed the resignation of Robert Nugent as Mission Superior he acted as Vice-Superior of the Irish Mission
1651-1656 When the invasion of Cromwell resulted in the closure of the Novitiate he went back to Rome, initially as Procurator of the Irish Mission (1651) and then sent as Spiritual Father of the Irish College (1652-1656) as well as Tertian Instructor in Romanae Province (ROM)
1656 Rector of Irish College Rome 24/02/1656 where he remained until he died in Office 13/07/1664
He died with the reputation of a Saint. Wonderful stories were told of the favours he received from God in prayer, and information as to his virtues was gathered in Ireland and forwarded to Rome as if it was intended to prepare his cause for beatification.

Young, Charles, 1798-1896, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/448
  • Person
  • 21 December 1798-16 January 1896

Born: 21 December 1798, Dublin
Entered: 02 September 1832, Hodder, Stonyhurst, England (ANG)
Ordained: by 1844
Professed: 15 August 1852
Died: 16 January 1896, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly

by 1839 in Namur studying Physics
by 1852 in Rome studying
by 1854 at Malta College teaching (ANG)

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
He had two brothers Priests of the Dublin Diocese, William and Henry - Henry was buried in the vaults of the Pro-Cathedral.
He had been a merchant who purchased Belvedere House for the Jesuits before Ent.
He had travelled much during his life, especially in Spain.

He studied in Rome and spent some time in Malta.
He was in the Dublin Residence for a short time.
He was Spiritual Father for long periods in Clongowes and Tullabeg.

Note from John MacDonald Entry :
He was attended there in his last hours by the saintly Charles Young.

Note from Patrick Rickaby Entry :
He also had a wonderful gift of taking care of the sick. This he did at Tullabeg, where he watched over the venerable Charles Young who died in his 98th year.

◆ Royal Irish Academy : Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press online :
from :
Young, Charles (1798–1896), found in Young, Charles (1746–1825)
by C. J. Woods

The youngest brother (son), Charles Young (1798–1896), born 21 December 1798, was educated at Oscott and lived for some years in Spain, becoming proficient in the Spanish language and literature. He assisted in the family business before joining the Society of Jesus (1832); he spent some years as a military chaplain in Malta but returned to Ireland (1840), divided his time between the Jesuit colleges at Tullabeg and Clongowes, and died 16 January 1896 at Tullabeg.

Yeomans, William, 1925-1989. Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 10 May 1925-08 January 1989

Born 10 May 1925, Leeds, Yorkshire, England
Entered 07 September 1942, Roehampton London - Angliae Province (ANG)
Ordained 31 July 1956
Professed 02 February 1960
Died 08 January 1989, London, England - Angliae Province (ANG)

by 1948 came to Tulllabeg (HIB) studying 1947-1950
by 1973 came to work at Veritas Communications Centre in Booterstown (HIB)

Wulfe, James, 1724-1783, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 1724-19 June 1783

Born 1724, El Puerta de Santa Maria, Cadiz, Spain
Entered 1748, Seville, Spain - Baeticae Province (BAE)
Ordained c 1754,
Died 19 June 1783, Ferrara, Italy - Peruvianae Province (PER)

1751 or 1754 He went to Peru certainly there in 1754 and already ordained.
Procurator in several colleges.
At the time of the expulsion he was acting as Prefect of the Houses of Retreats and the Confraternity of Loreto at Arequipa. He survived a journey, and landed in Italy, where he joined other Spanish exiles. He died at Ferrara in 1783.

Wrigley, William, 1859-1883, Jesuit scholastic

  • Person
  • 21 August 1859-24 February 1883

Born 21 August 1859, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
Entered 31 January 1880, Sevenhill Australia - Austriaco-Hungaricae Province (ASR-HUN)
Died 24 February 1883, St Ignatius College, Riverview, Sydney, Australia

Transcribed ASR-HUN to HIB : 1882

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Early education at St Patrick’s College, and Melbourne University.

First Australian Jesuit to join HIB

Died at Riverview of a stroke, following a cricket match in which he had played, 24/02/1883. His death had a profound effect on the students, all went to Confession that night and Mass the following day. At the funeral, they walked in procession, three abreast.

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
William Wrigley was the first native-born Australian to join the mission of the Irish Jesuits in Australia. He entered at Sevenhill, 31 January 1880. He had previously studied at St Patrick's College, East Melbourne, and gained a BA at The University of Melbourne. As a novice he had some ear trouble, which it was feared might prevent him from being admitted to vows. He was sent to St Ignatius' College, Riverview, and took vows in the chapel at Riverview, 16 June 1882, as the doctor declared that his deafness was gradually decreasing. He soon proved to be a very capable master, a good religious, and, in Joseph Dalton's view, the most useful and efficient of all the Australian Novices.
On Saturday, 24 February 1883, Wrigley bowled for the college XI against an Old Boys' team, and, jubilant at the college victory in one innings, led the race back to refreshments. He vaulted a gate at the southern edge of the field, close to where the infirmary was later built, and fell down on the other side, unconscious. He appeared to be dead, but according to the doctor, did not really die until about 8 pm. The school greatly mourned his loss.

Wrafter, Joseph, 1865-1934, Jesuit priest and chaplain

  • IE IJA J/705
  • Person
  • 09 August 1865-05 September 1934

Born: 09 August 1865, Rosenallis, Co Laois
Entered: 03 November 1883, Milltown Park, Dublin/Loyola House, Dromore, County Down
Ordained: 1899
Professed: 15 August 1902
Died: 05 September 1934, St Vincent’s Hospital

Part of the St Francis Xavier's, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin community at the time of death

Chaplain in the First World War.

by 1894 at Leuven Belgium (BELG) studying
by 1901 at Sartirana, Merate, Como, Italy (VEN) making Tertianship
by 1917 Military Chaplain : 8th Royal Munster Fusiliers, France
by 1918 Military Chaplain : 7th Leinster Regiment, BEF France
by 1919 Military Chaplain : Chaplain to the Forces, Schveningen, Netherlands

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :
Note from Nicholas Walsh Entry :
He died in the end room of Bannon’s corridor, and the Provincial William Delaney and Minister Joseph Wrafter were with him at the end.”

◆ Jesuits in Ireland : https://www.jesuit.ie/blog/damien-burke/a-sparrow-to-fall/

A sparrow to fall
Damien Burke
A BBC Northern Ireland documentary, Voices 16 – Somme (BBC 1 NI on Wednesday 29th June,
9pm) explores the events of 1916 through the testimony of the people who witnessed it and their families. Documentary makers and relatives of Jesuit chaplain Willie Doyle were shown his letters, postcards and personal possessions kept here at the Irish Jesuit Archives. In the 1920s, Alfred O’Rahilly used some of these letters in his biography of Fr Willie Doyle SJ. Afterwards they were given to Willie’s brother, Charles, and were stored for safekeeping in the basement of St Francis Xavier’s church, Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin in 1949. In 2011, they were accessioned into the archives.
Fr Willie Doyle SJ was one of ten Irish Jesuits who served as chaplains at the battle of the Somme (1 July- 18 November 1916): seven with the British forces; three with the Australian. Their letters, diaries and photographs witness their presence to the horror of war.

Fr Joseph Wrafter SJ, 8th Royal Munster Fusiliers (06 July 1916):
It is a very terrible thing where a show is on & no one I know wants any more of it than he has seen if he has been in it at all. But of course all have to see it through & the men are really splendid...Between killed & wounded we lost in that period quite a fourth of our Battalions & the Leinsters nearly as many. But they did good work & the enemy got a good deal more than they gave. It is dreadful to see the way the poor fellows are broken & mangled sometimes out of all recognition.

https://www.jesuit.ie/blog/damien-burke/jesuits-and-the-influenza-1918-19/

Jesuits and the influenza, 1918-19
Damien Burke
The influenza pandemic that raged worldwide in 1918-19 (misnamed the Spanish flu, as during the First World War, neutral Spain reported on the influenza) killed approximately 100 million people.

The influenza was widely referenced by Irish Jesuit chaplains in the First World War. And Fr Joseph Wrafter SJ writing in December 1918: “the influenza is raging here and all over Holland as everywhere”.

◆ Irish Province News

Irish Province News 9th Year No 4 1934

Obituary :

Father Joseph Wrafter

Father Wrafter died at St. Vincent's Hospital on Wednesday5th September, 1934. For a considerable time he had been in very poor health, even before he left Clongowes in 1932, he had suffered a good deal. He ws an invalid for nearly the two years he spent in Gardiner St., yet, with his usual courage, he did very fully all the work he was allowed to do. At last he was compelled to go to St. Vincent’s, where for some three weeks before his death he was very often quite unconscious.
In next number, we shall give a short sketch of his life in the Society.

Irish Province News 10th Year No 1 1935

Father Joseph Wrafter Continued

Father Wrafter was born near Rosenallis in Leix on the 9th August, 1865. He went with his two elder brothers, William and Thomas, to Tullabeg in 1877, where he remained until

  1. On November 3rd of that year he entered the Novitiate which was then at Milltown Park, but was transferred the following year to Dromore, Co. Down. He next spent a year
    as a Junior in Milltown, and had just begun his Philosophy there, when in November, 1886, the year of the amalgamation (Tullabeg and Clongowes) he was sent to Clongowes. He was Third Line and Gallery Prefect there for three years, and from 1889 to 1891 had charge of the Large Study. In the former of these years he utilised his great histrionic powers in getting up “The Tempest” which was an unqualified success. In 1891 he was appointed Higher Line Prefect although he had not yet done his Philosophy, and was the youngest man on the prefectorial staff. But his strength of character and sense of justice made up for these drawbacks. In 1893, after seven years' work as a scholastic in Clongowes, he went to Louvain for Philosophy, and in 1896 to Milltown Park for Theology, joining the Long Course.
    In the early summer of 1899 he went down to Clongowes to stay for about a month, in order to take the place of Father Fegan who had left to undergo a serious operation. However Father Wrafter remained in Clongowes the following year as Prefect of the Small Study, and next year saw him a Tertian in the Province of Venice.
    From 1900 to 1903 he was stationed in University College St, Stephen's Green, as Minister. After a year on the Mission Staff, with headquarters at the Crescent, Limerick, he renewed
    his connection With Clongowes, this time as Minister, remaining there until 1908, when he went to Gardiner St. and, in addition to the ordinary work, got charge of the Police Sodality. The next year he was appointed Minister and held that position until 1942, with the exception of a break of three years (1916-1919), when he was Military Chaplain in France and Holland. While at the front he distinguished himself by his great coolness and bravery. He was awarded the MC, but an officer who himself won the V.C., said that “every day, Father Wrafter did things that deserved the VC”.
    In 1924 he became Minister in Leeson St., and had charge of University Hall. Next year he again took up work in Clongowes as Minister and held the position for ten years. It was during these years that the new building was erected in Clongowes, in which Father Wrafter took a very great interest. 1934 saw him once more in Gardiner St, but incapable of much active work. However, as long as he possibly could, he said Mass and attended to his Confessional to which he had always been most devoted.
    He celebrated his Golden jubilee in the Society in November 1933, but did not long survive the event. The malady to which he had long been subject - phlebitis - had poisoned his system and after some weeks in hospital he died on 5th September 1934.
    The most remarkable thing about Father Wrafter's life in the Society was his long term of office as Minister in all twenty six years, thirteen in Clongowes, ten in Gardiner Stand ten in the University. He possessed in a high degree the qualities required for that office. He was a fine organiser quickly saw what was wanted, and then had the power to descend to details. He was extremely just and patient and was moreover the very soul of generosity, loving to see and to make others happy. To the poor also he was very kind. Many of the beggars and tramps who came to Clongowes made it a point to ask for Father Wrafter, they almost seemed to be personal friends of his so familiarly did he chat with them.
    What struck one most in Father Wrafter was his strong will and his great sense of duty Whatever he took in hand he saw through, and whatever was his duty would be done thoroughly. During his last few years as Minister in Clongowes he suffered from phlebitis which caused his legs to become very much swollen and painful, but unless absolutely forbidden by the doctor, he was sure to go down to the refectory to preside at the boys' meals. He was indefatigable in his care of and kindness to the sick, frequently visiting them in the infirmary during the night. This did not prevent him from being the first to rise in the morning. He always said the 6 o'clock Mass. Indeed it was wonderful how he contrived to do with so little sleep. In his last illness this strength of character was most noticeable, for though he suffered very much he never complained, but always made as little as possible of his sufferings. The nurses who attended him marveled, and were much edified at his patience and resignation.
    How much his kindness and help to so many were appreciated was shown by the number of people, many of them in humble circumstances who called at the hospital to enquire for him during his last illness. R.I.P

Woulfe, Jasper, 1673-1748, Jesuit priest

  • Person
  • 04 January 1673-29 October 1748

Alias de Lupis

Born 04 January 1673, Ireland
Entered 27 August 1691Bologna, Italy - Venetae Province (VEM)
Ordained c 1701, Mantua, Italy
Professed 02 February 1709
Died 29 October 1748, Bologna, Italy

1724 Went to Rome 24/03/1724

◆ Fr Francis Finegan SJ :
1693-1700 After First Vows he was sent for studies in Rheotoric and Philosophy to Parma, and then to Mantua for Theology, and Ordained c 1701. After Ordination he was not sent to teaching due to frail health,mainly his eyesight, but became known as a prudent Spiritual Director in Bologna
1701-1714 Sent as Minister to Ravenna, Brescia and the Noviciate at Novellara.
1714-1724 He was sent as Operarius at the Church in Bologna.
1724-1731 Sent to Scots College Rome as Prefect of Studies
1731-1732 Sent to Spain for health reasons and became Spiritual Director at the Irish College Salamanca. Rector at Irish College Salamanca where he was able to restore some peace in the College after the deposition of John Harrison, not least because he was seen as something of an outsider. he remained in this job for about eighteen months,
1732 He returned to Bologna and ministered in that city until his death while visitng one of the Churches 29/10/1748. His was considered to be an excellent Spiritual Director.

Woods, Brendan, 1924-2014, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/848
  • Person
  • 03 October 1924-28 May 2014

Born: 03 October 1924, Armagh, County Armagh
Entered: 07 September 1942, St Mary's, Emo, County Laois
Ordained: 31 July 1956
Professed: 05 November 1977
Died: 28 May 2014, Cherryfield Lodge, Dublin

Part of the Milltown Park, Dublin community at the time of death.

by 1973 at New York NY, USA (NEB) studying

Woodlock, Joseph M, 1880-1949, Jesuit priest and chaplain

  • Person
  • 01 February 1880-06 January 1949

Born: 01 February 1880, Bray, County Wicklow
Entered: 06 March 1899, Roehampton London - Angliae province (ANG)
Ordained: 1914
Professed: 02 February 1917
Died: 06 January 1949, Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England - Angliae province (ANG)

by 1912 came to Milltown (HIB) studying 1911-1915
by 1916 came to Tullabeg (HIB) making Tertianship

Woodlock, Francis, 1871-1940, Jesuit priest and chaplain

  • Person
  • 1871-1940

Fr Francis Woodlock SJ was born in Monkstown, County Dublin and was schooled at Beaumont. He entered the English Province in 1889 and served as a chaplain in the British Army during the First World War.

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