Northcote

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2 Name results for Northcote

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Lachal, Louis, 1906-1991, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/1549
  • Person
  • 11 May 1906-19 March 1991

Born: 11 May 1906, Northcote, Melbourne, Australia
Entered: 08 March 1925, Loyola, Greenwich, Australia (HIB)
Ordained 30 June 1940, Liverpool, England
Professed: 02 February 1979
Died: 19 March 1991, St Xavier’s, Bokaro Steel City, Hazaribag, Jharkhand, India - Ranchiensis Province (RAN)

Transcribed HIB to ASL 05-April 1931; ASL to RAN 12 March 1956

◆ HIB Menologies SJ :

Note from Francis Keogh Entry :
His death was keenly felt by those who served under him, especially at Sevenhill. Mr Lachal there wrote “He was the kindest of Superiors, a real father to the Novices, keeping a particularly keen eye on their health. I wish I had Father Rector’s ticket to heaven, Father Master once said to his Novices.’

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
Lou Lachal received his early education at the local parish school and his secondary education at Xavier College, Kew, where his father had been before him. Though he excelled perhaps more in sports than in studies, he graduated in 1924 with honours in French and Latin in the final examinations.
In March 1925 he joined the Jesuits at Greenwich, Sydney, and in 1927 he went to Rathfarnham for his juniorate studies, gaining a BA from the National University of Ireland. Philosophy studies followed in France, and he did regency at St Ignatius' College, Riverview, from 1933. He was rowing master among other things, and received a reprimand from the general for allowing the boys to mix with non-Catholics in the rowing sheds!
Theology studies followed at Naples, Italy, but World War II broke out and he moved to Liverpool in 1940 with a letter of commendation to any bishop to ordain him. He was ordained in Liverpool, completed his theology at Heythrop, Oxford, and then spent a few months caring for the needs of working class people in the city of Glasgow, Scotland.
Towards the end of 1941 Lachal returned to Australia via the Panama Canal. He was once again sent to Riverview. Tertianship at Loyola College, Watsonia, followed in 1945, after which he taught for two years at St Patrick's College. He worked in the parish of Richmond in 1948. He enjoyed his time there, and they appreciated the tall, strong, modest, pipe-smoking priest who could he relied upon for service at any time of day or night.
Lachal was among the first Australian Jesuits assigned to the mission in the Hazarihag region of India in 1951. He was 45 years old at the time, and was to spend another 40 years in India. He found Hindi studies difficult, but could generally make himself understood. His good humor and friendliness did the rest. Soon after arrival in India he became involved with direct missionary work at Chandwa, then one of the two parishes in the district of Palamau.
Later, he became parish priest of the Chechai region, which stretched for 130 miles, and then at Mahuadanr, followed by Hazaribag, Chandwa, Bhurkunda and Bokaro Steel City
Wherever he worked, his constant aim was first to provide an adequate education system, followed by health and other development projects to uplift poor people.
One of his greatest triumphs was setting up the Christian Centre at Bokaro Steel City in the vanguard of the ecumenical movement, Lachal proposed the Christian Centre as his
solution to the problem of how to share one small piece of real estate allotted by the Steele Authority to no less than ten groups all claiming to be Christian.
He was a caring father to all Jesuits in the Hazaribag diocese and to religious and lay people all over the Daltonganj diocese. Many sought his wise advice, encouragement and
companionship. People meant much to Lachal. He was a great conversationalist with a quick wit. In addition, he wrote thousands of letters, especially to the mission's friends and
supporters in Australia, assuring them of his interest and concern.
Lachal, commonly known as 'Lou', was greatly loved, respected and trusted by everyone, Jesuits and lay friends alike. He had a strong, outgoing personality, a man of immense charm, wisdom and optimism. His life was characterised by his availability to people anywhere at any time. He was rarely seen alone, he always had people around him. He had a solid, simple spirituality with a great devotion to Our Lady. He was regularly seen saying the Rosary, or heard singing Marian hymns during Mass. He regularly said two public Masses a day, even when he could only travel by rickshaw. When asked what he had been doing, he jokingly said that he had been “witnessing”, a constant feature of his long and happy life.

Logue, Walter, 1904-2002, Jesuit priest

  • IE IJA J/672
  • Person
  • 10 May 1904-07 June 2002

Born: 10 May 1904, Spencer Road, Waterside, Derry City, County Derry
Entered: 31 August 1921, St Stanislaus College, Tullabeg, County Offaly
Ordained: 31 July 1935, Milltown Park, Dublin
Final Vows: 02 February 1967
Died: 07 June 2002, Little Sisters of the Poor, Northcote, Melbourne, Australia

Part of the Campion College, Kew, Melbourne, Australia community at the time of death

Transcribed HIB to ASL : 05 April 1931

Father was a wholesale provision merchant and the family lives at Gortfoyle Villa, Waterside, Derry City, County Derry

Youngest of one girl and three boys.

Early education was at the Waterside National School for five years, and at age 11 went to St Columb’s, Derry (1915-1921).

by 1924 at Lyon France (LUGD) studying
by 1927 at Rome Italy (ROM) studying
by 1930 in Australia - Regency

◆ David Strong SJ “The Australian Dictionary of Jesuit Biography 1848-2015”, 2nd Edition, Halstead Press, Ultimo NSW, Australia, 2017 - ISBN : 9781925043280
Walter Logue's father, John, was a 'provision merchant', who arranged goods such as butter, pork and cereals to retailers. Walter was educated at the National School, and St Columb’s College, Derry. He entered the Society at Tullabeg, Ireland, 31 August 1921, and completed his juniorate studies at Lyon, France, and Rathfarnham, Dublin, 1923-25. He was considered a capable student and sent to Rome to study philosophy at the Gregorian University, but had a breakdown and returned to Dublin where he completed philosophy. Theology, 1932-36, was studied at Milltown Park, Dublin, and tertianship was at St Beuno's, Wales, 1936-37.
During his regency at St Aloysius' College, Milsons Point, 1928-31, he was remembered by his nickname, “Rosebud”, and for having “no notion of discipline”, and being “a perpetual volcanic fury”. As a result of this experience he spent a year of rest at Sevenhill. He returned to St Aloysius College, 1941-44, and again, 1951-54, when he was remembered as a fearsome French teacher very liberal in the use of the strap. However, he also contributed much to the intellectual life of the college as debating master, and for systematically building up the boys' library and for introducing the students to good literature, encouraging then to read regularly.
When teaching ethics to Jesuit scholastics, first at Watsonia, 1937-38, and then at Canisius College, Pymble, 1939-40, he was famed for his views on hunger striking. Stan Kelly sparked off the issue with an article in the December 1939 issue of The Canisian, in which he contended that hunger striking as an abstinence from necessary food, was intrinsically wrong. Logue contended that it had not been proved that abstinence from necessary food was intrinsically wrong. Kelly replied, but Logue was still unconvinced by the arguments proposed. It was suggested that this dispute contributed to Logue having a breakdown, disappearing one day and coming to himself confused, at Gosford. Logue was a very sensitive, highly strung and delicate person, having suffered from tuberculosis. In 1941 he returned to teaching French at St Aloysius' College, Milsons Point, or religion, French and Mathematics at St Louis School, Perth.
Probably because of the stress in a school classroom, Logue spent a few years as a spiritual director and teacher of Latin at the diocesan seminary, Corpus Christi College, Werribee, 1965-67. He also gave retreats. Then he became a kind and gentle mentor and teacher to the junior boys at St Ignatius' School, Norwood, 1968-84. He worked mainly in the library helping some boys with reading problems, and encouraged others to improve the quality of their reading. Many appreciated his support, and the new school library was named after him. He also kept up his scholarly interests, especially in moral theology He taught biblical Greek to a small study circle of retired gentlemen in the Norwood parish, and led others through a reading course on Cicero's De Senectute. Logue was a great defender of the faith, with traditional Roman thought and fidelity to the Holy Father. However, he was happy with the new developments in religious education because love rather than authority was emphasised.
From 1985 onwards, Logue was chaplain to the elderly and sick, first at St Joseph's Hospital Geelong, and then at St Vincent de Paul Hostel, Box Hill. As the years passed, he became
increasingly deaf, and with a gradual deterioration in his health, he spent his last years with the Little Sisters of the Poor at Northcote.
Throughout his life, he had to struggle with poor health, with several breakdowns, with shyness, with the demands of a schoolmaster, with increasing age and deafness. In spite of this, he remained a gentle, kindly spiritual person self-effacing, and lovable ever available to others. He was always the priest in his way of teaching, dealing with boys, acting as chaplain, saying Mass and giving the spiritual exercises At the time of his death he was the oldest Jesuit ever to have lived and worked in Australia.